Brainworx bx_console E & G Review Brainworx bx_console E & G Review
4.5
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In Living Color

There was a day and age before the luxury of modern DAWS where if you didn’t have some kind of console (and tape machine), you could not record or mix music. It’s almost hard to imagine nowadays. No plugins, emulations, or Command+Z. You were strictly limited to your console and outboard gear to record and mix with. And, with the console being the heart of your studio, it had to sound damn good since, much like converters nowadays, every track of audio ran through that console. It was this reality that helped inspire many, if not all of the legendary console (and therefore preamp, EQ, and sometimes compressor) designs from Neve, API, Trident, and Helios, amongst many and what we are going to be talking about today – SSL.

Solid State Logic is a UK based company that took a different approach to console and processor design (based upon much of their competition). Their first full format console was dubbed the 4000 E and it was released way back in 1979. Instead of the audio path being crammed full of transformers, inductors or gyrators (in the EQ section) and having tons of heavy transformer saturation, SSL went with a discrete, Class A design that relied heavily on VCA chips. In use, this design made it a much cleaner and brighter sounding console than many were used to, whilst the VCAs of it’s time lent a sound and saturation all of their own. A sound that would become an enduring component of the hit record mechanism.

“A sound that would become an enduring component of the hit record mechanism.”

At that time, there wasn’t really a console with more features than the SSL E Series, and even nowadays you’d be hard pressed to find such a well appointed piece. The dynamics section of each channel strip is incredibly versatile with a gate/expander and compressor. A 4 band, fully variable parametric EQ with unique filter shapes, variable Q, bell/shelf choices, plus a separate high and low pass filter section.

Remember how I said this design was fairly clean for the time? It was, but the E Series was notorious for its limited headroom – which meant the preamps and console were quick to overdrive, bringing out an edgy saturation which was a complete 180° turn from the rich, overdriven sound of say, a Neve. Luckily though, this saturation was something many engineers and producers grew fond of and were able to use to their advantage making punchier, more “in your face” sounding records than ever before. Much like the very bright and airy AKG C12 microphone, this brighter, edgier sound paired wonderfully with the smoother sound of magnetic tape. Vintage SSL consoles have remained incredibly popular well into the digital age.

“Vintage SSL consoles have remained incredibly popular well into the digital age.”

Random Task

The emulation masters at Brainworx and Plugin Alliance were kind enough to take a stab at modeling the channel strips of this classic design using their patent-pending “Tolerance Modeling Technology”, promising a much more authentic take than the seemingly millions of other E Series plugins. To be honest, I’m more of a Neve guy myself, but with that being said, when I want the sound of an SSL channel strip I normally gravitate towards the E Series due to its more obvious coloration. With so many past iterations of this console being made in a plugin format, it’s rare I get excited about a new SSL emulation but, due to the fantastic track record of Brainworx and Plugin Alliance, I have to say this was the exception. Will this finally be the SSL plugin that becomes a regular part of my workflow?

“…it’s rare I get excited about a new SSL emulation.”

A part of what makes a console sound like a console – and a significant variable that many developers overlook, is that every single channel of a vintage console sounds slightly different. This is largely due to the tolerances of the components at that time, their hand built nature and how the boards have actually aged. These variations have lead top engineers and producers to develop “favorite channels”. For instance, the last time I worked on an SSL I fell in love with channels 2, 11, and 14 ever so slightly more than the rest. The issue with this when it comes to the voracious modeling of leading plugin developers is the fact that they’ll pick a channel and base the entire plugin on a single channel strip, completely ignoring the rest of the console and it’s myriad, unique tonalities, frequency responses and phase shift.

Brainworx, being the sticklers for authenticity that they are, picked the road less traveled and not only modeled multiple channel strips of a well-maintained SSL 4000 E (which has been done once before) but every single channel of a MASSIVE 72 channel E Series! That’s not just counting the preamp by the way, that’s including variations in the EQ and dynamics sections as well, effectively giving you 72 options to pick the right 4000 E channel for the application. What is also brilliant is that when you are using bx_console E on a stereo source you get the option to hit a button to choose “digital mode” – which is two instances of the same virtual channel (therefore matching perfectly), or “analog mode” which allows you to pick two separate channels just like it is on the real deal.

“Brainworx, being the sticklers for authenticity that they are, picked the road less traveled.”

In the past I have found that two channels on a console that are far apart can be a better matched pair than adjacent channel and Brainworx’ emulation gives you the option to use channels 1 & 2 for example, or channels 1 & 62 which (whilst still giving you some very subtle variation) may actually end up being a closer match than 1 & 2! Or, you can purposely have two adjacent channels that aren’t all that perfect together in order to add to the musical imperfections that makes analog, well, analog.

Since SSL consoles seem to most often be used on modernistic genres (from what was cutting edge in 1979 to the crispest pop nowadays) I decided to stick to that theme and pull open an SSL-appropriate RnB track from Jamiah Hudson, more

specifically, the most “in your face” track from her new EP which I’m currently toiling over. Since Kendrick Lamar and Beyoncé have both had songs mixed on E Series consoles, I found this an extremely fitting project to use for testing.

E Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocals (THD Only) (Channel 38)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocals (THD Only) (Channel 2)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocals (THD -60, G Series Dynamics, Black Knob, GR 4-6) (Channel 2)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocals (Bypassed)

G Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocal (bx_console G) (Same Settings as E Series) (Orange EQ)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocal (bx_console G) (Same Settings as E Series) (Pink EQ)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Lead Vocals (Bypassed)

I began by loading bx_console E up on Jamiah’s lead vocal track and two things immediately caught my eye. First is a variable THD parameter, taking the form of a virtual screw, which is one of my all time favorite plugin features! This allows you to virtually drive the plugin without altering your levels and having to experiment with your input and output gain settings! Love it. To me, this is one of the best things they could have done with an SSL emulation, since every time things start sounding a bit stringent, I turn up the THD to add some more bottom end to the signal and balance everything back out. The signal takes on these beautiful, nostalgic color ways, steeped in genuine, organic compression the more it’s driven. A downplayed kaleidoscope of vibe that is slightly reminiscent of tape that worked extremely well on this project, especially on individual drum tracks.

“The signal takes on these beautiful, nostalgic color ways, steeped in genuine, organic compression the more it’s driven.”

The second thing that stood out to me was the “V Gain” knob which, I at first mistakenly thought was an output trim feature, until I turned to the manual Plugin Alliance thoughtfully includes with each download. Upon further perusal, I learned the “V Gain” knob is actually used to control the amount of virtual noise, therefore increasing the authenticity level, with the manual also recommending using the included gate to silence the noise during quiet sections! There’s also a virtual fader to act as an output attenuator if you want to have even more fun with gain staging / overdriving the input in addition to manually adjusting the THD to taste. Keep in mind that adjusting the input gain will affect the dynamics section, so make sure you pay attention to that if you already have it set the way you want it. I also highly recommend using the fader to make sure the signal is at unity gain when you bypass the plugin while auditioning so volume bias doesn’t kick in and make you blindly think the louder, processed version is better!

Virtual Noise

I’m going to be frank; I normally hate virtual noise features. One of my biggest pet peeves is when there’s permanently virtual noise that you can’t turn down or off! My personal opinion is that it can be cool in subtle amounts to add vibe to a song / fill in some space – but a great many plugins don’t even generate that noise in a realistic fashion. Plus literally since the beginning

of recording / pro audio the goal has always been to reduce the noise floor below the audible threshold with gates, higher gain tape machines, noise reduction units and then eventually removing tubes and transformers from gear altogether (much to engineers’ dismay when they realized some of those tube + transformers can go for $500+ a pop on eBay today),

So, I at least want to be able to adjust it! Luckily, you can turn the “V Gain” down or off, but the manual insists on leaving it on to add to the overall emulation. Thusly, I took the bait. Forever the software skeptic, I duplicated the lead vocal track, adding an exaggerated amount of “V Gain” to one and bypassing the “V Gain” on the other like I have done so many times before while testing other emulations. I then flipped the polarity by 180 degrees on one to see if it was strictly 50Hz or 60Hz noise left over, or if it was more lifelike and then added an instance of Izotope Insight for metering. I have found that one company who shall not be named (it isn’t PA) always brags about how hitting the “analog” or noise button changes the behavior of their plugins to make the processing more realistic, when in reality I found that all the

buttons do on all of their plugins is add strict 50Hz or 60Hz noise which isn’t even realistic to the actual noise floor of hardware! Having much more faith in Brainworx though, I followed the suggestion and what do you know – it was actually like a real analog noise floor! It was broadband and constantly changing itself subtly, and while it had a peak around 60Hz just like there is in real life, it wasn’t STRICTLY at 60Hz. So yes, the “V Gain” actually does add authentic sounding noise floor which when paired with the gate/expander really does squeeze out some extra authenticity. During louder sections, it can actually “fill in the cracks” of the mix in a way… much like when I will have one track of cleaned toms and one track of the toms with bleed left to add to the overall fullness of the track (this is a trick Randy Kohrs taught me).

So now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s get back to the vocals. Let me preface this by saying I have a handful of SSL channel strip plugins and I might as well not even own them because I rarely use them, if at all. Many of them just sound exaggerated in how bright they are so they come off as harsh or brittle to me on a lot of sources. I opened bx_console E on the lead vocal track, set “V Gain” to -100 (a VERY respectable hardware noise figure), set the compressor so it is hardly shaving off anything (-1dB to -2dB of gain reduction), with a 3:1 ratio in G Series mode (more on this later), very fast release (.15 S), 80% wet, and cranked the THD to about -60 and I was floored. It sounds phenomenal. I also really enjoyed channel 2 on her particular voice. Not only is it edgier and punchier like a good SSL console – but I was also able to make it both fatter, warmer and add very realistic dimension without even touching the EQ. This is possible because in their infinite wisdom, Brainworx included a very 2017 feature to complement the compressor – a mix knob! This is something that I and a couple of other producer/engineers at APN feel very strongly about. This functionality is something I wish just about every single plugin (and piece of hardware) came with. It’s also an improvement I look for in emulations. Not just authentic, great sounding modeling but real, relevant innovation. I want the devs to be like “ok, now that we have this sounding like some hardware, what could make it better that wasn’t feasible in the hardware format?”. To me, this says Brainworx is not only comprised of a team of developer but a team of honest-to-goodness audio engineers.

“I was also able to make it both fatter, warmer and add very realistic dimension without even touching the EQ.

You can tweak even further with the master / preamp section by selecting one of the 72 channels to slightly alter the frequency response, phase, and total harmonic distortion of each channel or you can hit random to roll the dice and end up on a random channel.

The coolest part of this is that you can hit “Random All” which communicates with every other bx_console E plugin in your project, assigning each a random channel all with one click of a button! The benefit of this when you start signal chains in your DAW with this plugin is that you get cohesion since every channel is modeled after the same SSL E Series mixer after all but then the subtle variations and non-linearity between the channels adds a sense of separation, realism and clarity to the mix, making everything sound slightly more three-dimensional. It’s not blatantly obvious on a single track, but as I’m going to demonstrate in the audio examples, all those little nuances add up when you add bx_console all throughout your mix.

Light CPU Load

“…even at 96KHz I was able to put an instance of bx_console E on every single track without a significant hit to my CPU”

This would mean very little though if the plugin was too CPU heavy to use multiple instances, but even at 96KHz I was able to put an instance of bx_console E on every single track without a significant hit to my CPU! It is rare that quality can be used in the same sentence as CPU friendly. The fact it is CPU friendly and has not only a preamp / saturation section but also a fully featured dynamics, EQ, and filter section means this plugin could viably be used in a DAW template with great results. In the world of pro audio where there are always deadlines looming over your head, this can really help speed things up. At the very least, you could create a template with bx_console E on tracks where SSLs are renowned for excelling (electric guitars, drums, aggressive / modern vocals, etc). That way you can get straight to creating the rough mix, letting your creativity take over from the very beginning, allowing you to spend time making the bigger mix decisions early on, saving smaller fine-tuning between different processors and specific plugins till later. Or, you can use this in the exact opposite way, which I had just as much if not more success with. I went about mixing my tracks as I normally would before adding bx_console E at the end of some chains in order to make some final changes and polish everything up a bit. It really does add a little something extra that many of its competitors have not been able to supply – solid as some of them are.

Drum Processing

Upon applying this plugin to the drums, I noticed something very special that Brainworx included as a feature. In the EQ section you can freely switch between black and brown knob variants of the E series equalizer effectively changing the tonality between the two revisions. The black knob setting was crisper and more hi-fi sounding, which I stuck with for drums and vocals, whilst the brown knob variant is smoother with a bit less clarity. These are slight yet audible changes you’ll hear before you even boost or cut a single band. The EQ revisions themselves also react differently when boosting or cutting, just like they are supposed to! Not only this, but you can also choose between the E series and G series dynamic sections – getting to choose if you want a little more “vibe” with the E Series or if you want things cleaner and more precise with the G Series. Didn’t see that one coming, but I’m so glad it’s included. The bx_console G Series channel compressor not only added more attack to the snare with the settings I dialed in, but also gave it a enough extra sustain to slot it nicely in the mix.

The SSL G Series dynamics section also includes what is likely my all time favorite gate to use on snare drums which is the one processor of the G Series family I find myself using the most often (besides perhaps the buss compressor – see my article on the Serpent Audio SB4001). The gate is the same on both E and G Series desks – unlike the channel strips. The G Series gate is more transparent to my ears, but still with a touch of SSL vibe that really helps my snare punch through even the densest mixes. Another feature this plugin has that the hardware does not is the “INV” button in the gate / expander section, which allows you to audition strictly what is being gated.

It is like Brainworx overheard past conversations I’ve had regarding my favorite parts of each console in a concerted attempt to redeem the fact that the SSL is lower on my dream console list than some other iconic designs. With drums I was able to add copious amounts of life and energy that just made everything pop whilst simultaneously using the THD (which I just about maxed out on all drums but the hi hats and toms) and dynamics sections (again, G Series in this case) to keep everything from becoming overly present. It’s the kind of situation where I bypass the channel strips and get a little bummed out when my drum sound disappears. Hitting  the “random one” button on each drum channel and playing Russian roulette with channels in order to find the perfect match was a lot of fun. I found channel 53 accentuated the kick drum and digital tom, channel 45 added some more crack to the snare, and 46 paired perfectly with the hi hats. It didn’t make a day and night difference (since that isn’t the case with well maintained consoles), but it certainly made a notable and exciting change. The bx_console E is really in its element with electronic drums, that’s for sure.

“With drums I was able to add copious amounts of life and energy that just made everything pop.”

E Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Kick (-30 THD Only) (Channel 53)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Kick (-30 THD, G Series Dynamic, Black Knob Initialized, 6dB GR) (Channel 53)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Kick (Bypassed)

It is like Brainworx overheard past conversations I’ve had regarding my favorite parts of each console in a concerted attempt to redeem the fact that the SSL is lower on my dream console list than some other iconic designs. With drums I was able to add copious amounts of life and energy that just made everything pop whilst simultaneously using the THD (which I just about maxed out on all drums but the hi hats and toms) and dynamics sections (again, G Series in this case) to keep everything from becoming overly present. It’s the kind of situation where I bypass the channel strips and get a little bummed out when my drum sound disappears. Hitting  the “random one” button on each drum channel and playing Russian roulette with channels in order to find the perfect match was a lot of fun. I found channel 53 accentuated the kick drum and digital tom, channel 45 added some more crack to the snare, and 46 paired perfectly with the hi hats. It didn’t make a day and night difference (since that isn’t the case with well maintained consoles), but it certainly made a notable and exciting change. The bx_console E is really in its element with electronic drums, that’s for sure.

 

On a quick side note, for the processed full mix audio examples (bx_console E on every track), I matched the EQ and compression settings of bx_console E with the same settings in FabFilter Pro-C 2 and FabFilter Pro-Q 2 for the “bypassed” and “THD Only” files so that me turning on the bx_console EQ and dynamics sections on a couple tracks didn’t skew the results. Being that FabFilter makes brilliantly transparent plugins (likely my favorite of that style), I figured this would establish a great baseline for the tests. As always, all examples are at unity gain with the bypassed examples, though the copious saturation from bx_console E did add some perceived loudness as expected. Anyways, the result of the transparent processing versus what bx_console E brought to the table certainly speaks for itself.

“the result of the transparent processing versus what bx_console E brought to the table certainly speaks for itself.”

As if there weren’t enough additional features already, there’s also a handy (and fully variable) sidechain high pass filter that ranges all the way from 10Hz to 2000Hz built into the compressor section. This allows you to throw console E on the drum bus, or hell, even the mix bus if you so wish, then filter out the low end in the sidechain so that the kick drum (or even bass) isn’t triggering and overworking the compressor, due to the Fletcher-Munson / equal loudness curve. This allows the

low end to breath and the compressor to be triggered by the more uniform aspects of the mix, adding even more to an overall sense of cohesion and the word SSL all but coined… Glue. You can also hit “DYN SC” button in the filter section, which will feed those filters into the compressor’s sidechain, giving you even more options. Perfect if you don’t want to compress above 12KHz on a lead vocal track to leave that shimmery air you worked so hard to achieve untouched! Another notable feature of this plugin (and the original SSL channel strips) is the order of each section in the

“You may also bypass the dynamics and EQ sections separately to either audition your processing.”

signal path, and the option to switch the dynamic and EQ section’s position in the chain. In this case, you hit the PRE button at the bottom of the EQ section to move the EQ in front of the compressor. I almost always recommend compressing before you boost with an EQ since otherwise your EQ is going to effect the compression, which can potentially counteract the EQ boost you just made. The exception to this is when you want to smooth out the boost you just made with the compressor, though I would say this is somewhat rare in application. I also tend to cut / filter before the compressor, since otherwise the compressor is being fed signal you are just going to remove anyway which is in turn altering how that compressor is reacting. Enough insight went into the original design of these channel strips to make this a process you don’t have to think twice about and, if you do, you can audition it the other way around with the push of a button. You may also bypass the dynamics and EQ sections separately to either audition your processing or, as I found myself doing quite a lot; using strictly the preamp / master section of the plugin on every channel in my DAW to give the mix a true analog mixer-feel.

Dynamic Sidechaining

To top it all off, Brainworx have added internal and external sidechain / key input functionality. You can actually use the EQ from within this plugin to affect the sidechain of the compressor. Brainworx is just spoiling us at this point. Using this, you can find a sibilant frequency with the bx_console E EQ and use it to target that frequency in the dynamic section, effectively turning it into a very powerful de-esser. Or, you can use any external plugin or hardware EQ to trigger the compressor’s sidechain as well, allowing you to duck the bass guitar when there’s a kick drum hit or any other creative application you can think up. Like the original desk, you get the options of “fast attack” or “auto attack” for both the compressor and the gate / expander. I do wish Brainworx had thrown in an optional variable attack parameter, though the two settings cover a surprising amount of ground as is. Regardless of what you think about SSL, they certainly did a solid job on their auto parameters. Brainworx have still managed to include a second release parameter in the form of another fully variable screw (like THD) that allows you to set a secondary release time in order to keep the compression more transparent on say, clean lead vocals, acoustic instruments, or drum overheads. This officially completes my holy trinity of plugin features and really gear features in general: Compressor sidechain filtering, wet/dry parallel mix knob, and variable THD.

“You can actually use the EQ from within this plugin to affect the sidechain of the compressor. Brainworx is just spoiling us at this point.”

G Series Joins The Party

Upon completing this review, like clockwork, Brainworx launched the new bx_console G plugin. Since this and bx_console E are so similar yet complimentary, I can’t help but to briefly touch on it as well. The main overall tonal differences between an SSL E Series and G Series consoles start with the overall tone and feel. Accurate to the real life consoles, bx_console G is a little cleaner, smoother, and more “hi-fi” sounding. This is great in situations where you still want that SSL touch, but bx_console E might be a tad abrasive for your project.

E or G Series?

Luckily, bx_console G is just as high quality as bx_console E in every way. You still have 72 channels and the option to drive the preamp stage to produce the distinctive but comparatively mellow G Series saturation. bx_console G features the very same dynamic section options (both E Series and G Series versions) besides some slight tonal and response variations between different channel numbers exactly like bx_console E. The main differences lie within the EQ section. True to the inspiration, both bx_console G equalizers are gentler and in many ways, more versatile. I say both because you get 2 choices for the EQ section (like bx_console E) that make a pretty drastic difference to the overall sound. Many (including myself in this case) find both to be less grabby and more smooth and musical than E, which allows it to shine on an incredible amount of sources. While bx_console E’s EQ has a relatively tight, conventional Q regardless of your settings that gives it that edgier, grabby, in your face sound… bx_console G’s EQs have a modified slope with a level of proportionate Q to it. This keeps things sounding a little more natural and lets you make more extreme changes if need be.

E Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Guitar/Pad Sample (THD -60, G Series Dynamics, Brown Knob, GR 3) (Channel 62+63)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Guitar/Pad Sample (THD -60, G Series Dynamics, Black Knob, GR 3) (Channel 62+63)

G Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Guitar/Pad Sample (Same Settings as E Series) (Orange Knob)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Guitar/Pad Sample (Same Settings as E Series) (Pink Knob)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Guitar/Pad Sample (Bypassed)

The Pink EQ selection adds a small dip before each EQ boost and a small rise before every cut, which adds to its musical yet precise nature. This is great for that classic pop music sound, where things stay bright, modern, open, and slightly punchy, without being quite as aggressive and punchy as bx_console E. While bx_console E may shine on pop/hip-hop/electronic drums, aggressive guitars, rock bass, and rock/rap vocals… bx_console G is a natural choice for sculpting sung vocals/choruses, smoother basses, keyboards/synths, overheads/cymbals, and even acoustic instruments. This Pink or 292 type G Series variety is what I’ve learned to associate with classic SSL G equalization over the years; clean, modern, and “shiny” sounding. Unlike the E Series’ EQ sections, you also get the x3 and /3 frequency buttons on the HMF and LMF bands (like you also get on the E Series and now the G Series filters). This way, you can select 6KHz and then click the x3 button to effectively boost or cut 18KHz… giving you additional high frequency control. The opposite is true for the low mid band and the /3 button. The “Orange Knob” 132 EQ option is actually based on a rare passive equalizer option created by SSL, believe it or not. And while it is very different sounding than something like a Pultec, it still has that smooth, sweet, forgiving nature to it which can be a thing of beauty on vocals and bass. Being meant to emulate the curves of tube EQs (and being a Brown Knob variant) it isn’t nearly as crisp sounding, but sometimes that is exactly what the track calls for. With it being day and night from the Pink emulation, and just as far away from the E Series EQ emulations –  this adds even more functionality and potential applications to bx_console G’s already extremely versatile EQ. What’s awesome is that it allows experimentation with an SSL EQ type that many engineers may have never ever heard of. If you’re familiar with bx_console E already, then bx_console G will be a walk in the park. Instead of being the ying to the E Series’ yang… bx_console G is basically the ying+1 to bx_console E’s ying.

E Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Full Mix (bx_console E All Tracks) (Matched Comp / EQ on Sample+Lead Vox)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Full Mix (bx_console E All Tracks) (THD Only)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Full Mix (Bypassed)

G Series Audio Examples

APN | Michael Frasinelli Full Mix (bx_console G, Every Track) (Same Settings as E Series)
APN | Michael Frasinelli Full Mix (Bypassed)

CONCLUSION

I went into this thinking, “oh, another SSL plugin…” and, because I don’t really love SSL desks and am definitely left cold by most SSL plugin emulations” it’s almost unthinkable that I came out of this regarding Consoles E & G as SSL plugins I will actually use regularly! Take it from the Neve guy, these plugins rock. Granted, I can’t see myself using the EQ and compressor from console E on every track or using it for applications I wouldn’t personally use a real E Series for (acoustic instruments, strings, horns, etc), but that is the point of different gear being modeled. I don’t know what’s up with me reviewing a string of plugins where so many have become my favorite emulations, but it’s certainly a great time to be an audio engineer, producer, and/or studio owner. You no longer need tens of thousands of dollars, loads of patch cables, and a massive spare room to get a sound this close to the real deal – bx_consoles E and G are the purest evidence there is of a genuine paradigm shift.

“…bx_consoles E and G are the purest evidence there is of a genuine paradigm shift.”

Price and Availability

bx_console E and G weigh in at  $299 USD (Introduction price of $179

You can purchase bx_console E directly from here.

You can purchase bx_console G directly from here.

Compatibility

Compatible on Mac:

OS X 10.8 – 10.12:  AU, VST2, VST3, AAX (Native, DSP, and Venue)

Compatible on Windows:

Windows 7 – 10: VST2, VST3, AAX (Native, DSP, and Venue)

 

“These are simply the best SSL channel strip emulations that I’ve ever had the pleasure to use.”

This is simply the best SSL channel strip emulation that I've ever had the pleasure to use. You get what you pay for, so the price is pretty steep for a single channel strip plugin
  • 72 channel strips modeled
  • Fully featured master / preamp section with input gain
  • Very low CPU hit
  • High cost
  • No added optional Attack times

4 of 5

5 of 5

4 of 5

5 of 5

5 of 5

3 of 5

Michael Frasinelli

Studio Owner, Audio Engineer, and Producer based in Nashville, TN, mentored by and working closely with Grammy Award winning Producer, Engineer, and Musician Randy Kohrs. Highly active analog gear habit, with a plugin hobby on the side. DIY audio enthusiast with an interest in all things circuitry.

 

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